Constellation Ursa Minor (Little Bear)

Ursa Minor
Ursa Minor: IAU Constellation Map [150]

Properties

The constellation lies between Draco, Cepheus and Camelopardalis at the north celestial pole. This is currently only about 0.8° away from the bright star Polaris. Ursa Minor has roughly the same alignment as its larger relative Ursa Maior and is therefore easily recognizable. The area of the constellation is 256 square degrees and the center culminates around midnight on 13 May. [9, 15]

Stars with Proper Names:

  • α UMi: Polaris, Alruccabah, Cynosura, Phoenice, Lodestar, Pole Star, Tramontana, Angel Stern, Navigatoria, Star Of Arcady, Yilduz, Mismar
  • β UMi: Kocab, Kochab, Kochah, "Guards Of The Pole
  • γ UMi: Pherkad, Pherkad Major
  • δ UMi: Yildun, Vildiur, Gildun
  • 11 UMi: Pherkad Minor
Data for constellation Ursa Minor [150]
IAU NameUrsa Minor
IAU GenitiveUrsae Minoris
IAU Abbr.UMi
English NameLittle Bear
Season (47° N)January … December
Right Ascension00h 00m 00s … 24h 00m 00s
Declination+65° 23' 59" … +90° 00' 00"
Area256 deg2
Neighbours (N↻)Cep, Cam, Dra

Determine the Visual Magnitude Limit

Ursa Minor
Ursa Minor: Finder chart for the faintest, still visible stars [149]

A "Wow!" night sky that is so clear and dark that the Milky Way runs from one horizon to the other and the space between the stars appears black and not blue has become rare. Sometimes there are only a few nights a year.

The quality of the night sky is mainly determined by the amount of water droplets and dust particles in the atmosphere; In addition, the sky is brightened by natural light (sun, moon, airglow) and artificial light (street lighting, advertising lighting, disco light shows). The higher the water and dust content in the atmosphere, the more susceptible it is to external lighting, as the light is scattered by these particles. This can be seen well at night in foggy car headlights and street lights.

The picture opposite shows Ursa Minor, as this constellation is visible all year round and is always about the same height in the sky. One waits until the eye is completely adapted to the dark (approx. After 30 minutes) and then tries to determine the weakest stars that are barely visible to the naked eye with the help of the map. If you look past the stars (indirect vision), you can still see those that cannot or can hardly be seen when looking directly at them.

Mythology and History

A part of the constellation Ursa Minor is likely to be at least Phoenician in origin and was used for navigation there. Until about 600 BC The constellation was not included in the group of Greek constellations and was therefore not mentioned by the Greek poets Homer and Hesiod. The Greek navigators used the Big Bear as a navigation aid. The constellation of the dragon was then more luxurious than we know it today, because the dragon had wings on the star alpha Draconis and was therefore particularly impressive according to its mythological meaning . The Greek philosopher Thales of Miletus regrouped the stars of the dragon's wings, creating a seven-star constellation that was very similar to the Big Dipper, except that it stood in the opposite direction in the sky. This so-called Little Dipper was a memorable navigation aid and therefore quickly caught on.

In addition to the names Ursa Minor, Little Bear and Little Carriage, there are also the names Ursa Phenicia and Phoenice has been used. The translation of the name "Little Bear" into the Arabic language led to the proper name Al Dubb al Asghar, which was used by the German astronomer Bayer Dhubb Elezguar and the English author Chilmead Dub Alasgar was written. The early Nordic cultures saw the Little Chariot or Thor's Throne in this constellation. [20]

Catalogs

Yale Bright Star Catalogue, 5th Revised Ed. (Hoffleit+, 1991) [154]
HR B F RA [hms] Dec [dms] vMag spType dMag Sep ["]
424α102 31 48.7+89 15 512.02 F7:Ib-II v6.818.4
5305314 06 56.4+74 35 376.45 A7V
5321414 08 50.9+77 32 514.82 K3III
5430514 27 31.5+75 41 464.25 K4-IIIBa0.3 7.858.8
5563β714 50 42.3+74 09 202.08 K4-III 9.2209.1
57141115 17 05.9+71 49 265.02 K4III
5735γ1315 20 43.7+71 50 023.05 A3II-III v
5826θ1515 31 24.9+77 20 584.96 K5III
5903ζ1615 44 03.5+77 47 404.32 A3Vn
60791916 10 49.5+75 52 395.48 B8V
60822016 12 32.2+75 12 386.39 R K2IV
6116η2116 17 30.3+75 45 194.95 F5V 10.8227.
6322ε2216 45 58.1+82 02 144.23 G5III 8.376.9
6789δ2317 32 12.9+86 35 114.36 A1Vn
68112417 30 48.0+86 58 055.79 A2m
7394λ17 16 56.8+89 02 166.38 M1III 7.554.7

Revised+Historic NGC/IC, Version 22/9, © Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke [277]
Galaxies
NameRADecTypebMagvMagDimDreyer DescriptionIdentification, Remarks
NGC 317211 47 14.5+89 05 37S?15.014.11 × 0.7vF, R, gbM, * 11 s 2', Polarissima BorealisMCG 15-1-11, CGCG 370-8B, CGCG 370-2A, NPM1G +89.0003, Polarissima borealis
NGC 503413 12 19.2+70 38 59Sc14.013.30.9 × 0.7vF, vS, RUGC 8295, MCG 12-13-1, CGCG 336-3, IRAS 13107+7054
NGC 5144 A13 22 53.9+70 30 53Sc/P13.413.11.2 × 0.8planetary ?, cB, S, R, g, slbMUGC 8420, MCG 12-13-5, MK 256, IRAS 13214+7046, CGCG 336-8, 7ZW 511, KUG 1321+707
NGC 5144 B13 22 53.5+70 30 36C16.015.00.2 × 0.2planetary ?, cB, S, R, g, slbMUGC 8420, MCG 12-13-5, MK 256, CGCG 336-8, 7ZW 511
NGC 526213 35 38.5+75 02 24E-S015.214.21.2 × 0.7eF, SUGC 8606, CGCG 353-22, NPM1G +75.0089, KCPG 386B
NGC 531413 46 11.1+70 20 23S14.713.91 × 0.5vF, eS, stellar, eF * v closeMCG 12-13-9, CGCG 336-17
NGC 532313 45 36.0+76 49 42Sab14.313.51.4 × 0.4vF, pS, lE 0° ±UGC 8719, MCG 13-10-12, CGCG 353-25, IRAS 13451+7704
NGC 534013 48 59.8+72 39 16S15.514.70.8 × 0.5eF, S, RMCG 12-13-14, CGCG 336-22, NPM1G +72.0115
NGC 534413 50 12.0+73 57 12S15.314.50.6 × 0.4vF, S, RCGCG 336-26, NPM1G +74.0102
NGC 541213 57 13.4+73 37 02E-S014.413.41.2 × 1pF, S, R, D * pUGC 8905, CGCG 336-33, NPM1G +73.0098
NGC 541513 56 56.8+70 45 18S15.214.41 × 0.6eF, vS, R, 2 F st nrCGCG 336-32, NPM1G +70.0124
NGC 545213 54 24.3+78 13 14SBcd14.013.32 × 1.5vF, pL, iR, vgvlbMUGC 8867, MCG 13-10-14, CGCG 353-28
NGC 547914 05 57.3+65 41 28E-S015.014.00.7 × 0.5cF, vS, R, nearly bet 2 stMCG 11-17-19, CGCG 317-16, NPM1G +65.0105
NGC 554714 09 45.1+78 36 06S/P14.813.90.6 × 0.4eF, vS, E 0° ±UGC 9095, CGCG 353-31, NPM1G +78.0073, IRAS 14101+7850
NGC 560714 19 26.7+71 35 17S/P13.913.40.9 × 0.8pF, cS, iR, bM, erNGC 5620, IC 1005, UGC 9189, MCG 12-41-1, MK 286, 7ZW 547, IRAS 14188+7148, CGCG 337-7
NGC 567114 27 42.3+69 41 41SBb14.113.31.7 × 1.2vF, pL, R, bMUGC 9297, MCG 12-14-6, CGCG 337-14, IRAS 14268+6955
NGC 571214 29 41.6+78 51 53E-S015.514.50.7 × 0.7vF, S, R, S Cl pMCG 13-10-21, CGCG 353-42, CGCG 354-5, 7ZW 553, NPM1G +79.0122
NGC 580814 54 02.7+73 07 55SBbc14.313.50.9 × 0.9vF, S, iR, bet 2 stNGC 5819, UGC 9609, CGCG 337-23, IRAS 14540+7319
NGC 583214 57 45.7+71 40 53SBb12.912.13.6 × 2.2pB, cL, iR, bp, rUGC 9649, MCG 12-14-15, CGCG 337-25, IRAS 14575+7152, KARA 656, KAZ 409
NGC 583614 59 31.1+73 53 35SBb14.713.91.2 × 1eF, vS, lE, 2 st invUGC 9664, MCG 12-14-16, CGCG 337-26, 7ZW 576
NGC 590915 11 27.9+75 23 04Sbc14.613.81.1 × 0.5vF, vSUGC 9778, MCG 13-11-10, CGCG 354-21, KCPG 460A, NPM1G +75.0113
NGC 591215 11 40.5+75 23 05E-S014.813.81.2 × 1.1vF, vSMCG 13-11-11, CGCG 354-22, KCPG 460B
NGC 593915 24 45.8+68 43 47Sbc13.913.10.9 × 0.5pB, pS, lEUGC 9854, MCG 12-15-7, CGCG 338-8, IRAS 15244+6854
NGC 601115 46 32.4+72 10 09Sb14.313.52 × 0.7vF, S, E 90° ±, vS * fUGC 10047, MCG 12-15-16, CGCG 338-17
NGC 604815 57 30.2+70 41 20E213.312.32.2 × 1.7F, R, bMUGC 10124, MCG 12-15-38, CGCG 338-32
NGC 606815 55 25.5+78 59 48SBbc13.612.81 × 0.7Vf, vS, lE 0°, rUGC 10126, MCG 13-11-19, CGCG 354-31, IRAS 15575+7908, CGCG 355-5, ARAK 492, KAZ 53, KCPG 476B
NGC 6068 A15 54 47.4+78 59 08S015.014.00.9 × 0.2Vf, vS, lE 0°, rMCG 13-11-17, CGCG 354-30, CGCG 355-4, KCPG 476A, KAZ 52, NPM1G +79.0130
NGC 607116 02 06.9+70 25 02E-S014.913.91 × 1eF, vSMCG 12-15-47, CGCG 338-41, NPM1G +70.0158
NGC 609116 07 52.9+69 54 19S14.914.10.8 × 0.5vF, vS, R, * nMCG 12-15-54, CGCG 338-47, NPM1G +70.0159
NGC 609416 06 33.8+72 29 42S014.213.21.8 × 1.4vF, vS, lEUGC 10228, MCG 12-15-52, CGCG 338-45, NPM1G +72.0141
NGC 621716 32 38.7+78 11 57SBbc11.811.23 × 2.5B, cL, lE, slbMUGC 10470, MCG 13-12-8, CGCG 355-14, Arp 185, KAZ 73, IRAS 16350+7818
NGC 625116 32 31.8+82 32 18E213.612.61.8 × 1.5cF, S, bM, p of 2UGC 10501, MCG 14-8-10, CGCG 367-13, NPM1G +82.0085
NGC 625216 32 40.3+82 34 38S15.014.20.7 × 0.3vF, vS, f of 2MCG 14-8-11, CGCG 367-14, NPM1G +82.0086
NGC 632417 05 25.3+75 24 28Sbc13.712.91 × 0.6vF, S, E, S * sUGC 10725, MCG 13-12-16, CGCG 355-25, IRAS 17070+7528, ARAK 517, KAZ 120
NGC 633117 03 34.3+78 37 47E315.414.40.6 × 0.4eF, SMCG 13-12-15, CGCG 355-24, DRCG 35-49
IC 94513 47 07.5+72 04 12Sb15.014.20.9 × 0.7eeF, S, R, 2 st nfUGC 8732, MCG 12-13-10, CGCG 336-18
IC 95413 49 56.3+71 09 53P14.713.71.1 × 0.6eeF, S, R, B * fUGC 8765, MCG 12-13-18, CGCG 336-24, 7ZW 527
IC 104614 37 53.2+69 00 52Sc15.214.50.8 × 0.4eF, S, R, D * fMCG 12-14-11, CGCG 337-17
IC 108314 55 33.5+68 24 31Sbc15.314.50.7 × 0.3eeF, S, RMCG 12-14-14, CGCG 337-24
IC 111015 12 05.3+67 21 44Sa14.914.01.4 × 0.4eeF, S, mEUGC 9773, MCG 11-19-1, CGCG 318-22, CGCG 319-4, KARA 666
IC 112915 32 00.8+68 14 48Sc13.813.11.1 × 0.9vF, pS, iR, D * nfUGC 9899, MCG 11-19-10, CGCG 319-19, IRAS 15316+6825
IC 113915 29 26.0+82 35 04S15.714.90.6 × 0.2eeF, S, lE, v difficCGCG 366-17, NPM1G +82.0076
IC 114315 30 55.8+82 27 23E014.213.20.9 × 0.9pF, vS, R, * nrUGC 9932, MCG 14-7-22, CGCG 366-18, NPM1G +82.0078
IC 114515 44 08.3+72 25 51Sbc15.014.21.5 × 0.5eeF, pS, R, III. 313 nrUGC 10032, MCG 12-15-15, CGCG 338-15, IRAS 15445+7235
IC 115415 52 28.5+70 22 32E214.313.31 × 0.8vF, pS, RUGC 10088, MCG 12-15-35, CGCG 338-29, NPM1G +70.0153
IC 118715 59 10.1+70 33 27S?15.815.00.4 × 0.2* 13 with nebMCG 12-15-40, CGCG 338-34, NPM1G +70.0156
IC 120416 07 15.3+69 55 54S?15.514.70.6 × 0.3vF, S, stell N, * 11 f 3'MCG 12-15-53, CGCG 338-46, IRAS 16073+7003
IC 447014 28 22.8+78 53 10S?15.214.41 × 0.2Cl, eF, S, ? nebMCG 13-10-19, CGCG 354-3, CGCG 353-40, NPM1G +79.0121
IC 466017 21 45.0+75 50 55S14.513.61.3 × 0.3pL, E ns, * 9.2 sp 30"UGC 10848, MCG 13-12-23, CGCG 355-32, IRAS 17235+7553

References

9«Drehbare Sternkarte SIRIUS» von H. Suter-Haug; Hallwag-Verlag, Bern
15«Hartung's Astronomical Objects for Southern Telescopes» by David Malin and David J. Frew; Melbourne University Press 1995; ISBN 0-522-84553-3
20«Sternbilder und ihre Mythen» von Gerhard Fasching; Zweite, verbesserte Auflage; Springer Verlag Wien, New York; ISBN 3-211-82552-5 (Wien); ISBN 0-387-82552-5 (New York)
149SkySafari 6 Pro, Simulation Curriculum; skysafariastronomy.com
150IAU: The Constellations, 11. Oktober 2020; iau.org/public/themes/constellations
154Yale Bright Star Catalog, 15. Oktober 2020; tdc-www.harvard.edu/catalogs/bsc5.html
277«Historische Deep-Sky Kataloge» von Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke; klima-luft.de/steinicke (2021-02-17)